Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flood Web Tools Comparison Matrix - Massachusetts

Why Use This? This matrix was created to provide the planning and coastal management communities with an expandable chart to compare the functions and methods of publicly available sea level rise and coastal flood web tools. The information in each column is provided by the web tool owner. Specific questions about the tools can be addressed to the tool owner through the contact information provided in their matrix column. For more information or to suggest additional web tools, visit the national matrix page.

Suggested Citation: The Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flood Web Tools Comparison Matrix. The Nature Conservancy, NOAA's Office for Coastal Management, Climate Central. URL, Date Access:

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Climate Central
Surging Seas Risk Finder
NOAA's Office for
Coastal Management
Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts Viewer

NOAA's Office for
Coastal Management
Coastal Flood Exposure Mapper

Massachusetts Office of Costal Zone Management
MORIS (Massachusetts Ocean Resource Information System)

Cape Cod Commission
Sea Level Rise Viewer

MassCZM/Town of Barnstable/Woods Hole Sea Grant/ Cape Cod Cooperative Extension
Expanded Floodplains for the Town of Barnstable in Support of CRS Activities

NOAA/National Weather Service/WFO Taunton
Coastal Hazard Portal and Inundation Maps

Tool   Surging Seas Risk Finder
Climate Central

Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts Viewer
NOAA's Office for
Coastal Management

Coastal Flood Exposure Mapper
NOAA's Office for
Coastal Management

MORIS (Massachusetts Ocean Resource Information System)
Massachusetts Office of Costal Zone Management

Sea Level Rise Viewer
Cape Cod Commission

Expanded Floodplains for the Town of Barnstable in Support of CRS Activities
MassCZM/Town of Barnstable/Woods Hole Sea Grant/ Cape Cod Cooperative Extension

Coastal Hazard Portal and Inundation Maps
NOAA/National Weather Service/WFO Taunton
10 GENERAL Geographic Scope Geographic extent the tool defines or covers (i.e. national, statewide, county…) Available for the entire contiguous coastal U.S. -- 22 states and Washington, D.C. -- with releases planned for HI and AK in the future. National Coastal areas along Gulf of Mexico and East Coast Variable; focused on Massachusetts Barnstable County (Cape Cod), Massachusetts Community - Town of Barnstable, MA Massachusetts and Rhode Island coastal
10 GENERAL Link The URL or link where the tool can be accessed riskfinder.climatecentral.org coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/tools/slr, coast.noaa.gov/slrdata/ coast.noaa.gov/floodexposure maps.massgis.state.ma.us/map_ol/
moris.php
capecodcommission.org/sealevelrise www.mappingcoastalma.com/expanded-floodplains.html www.weather.gov/box/coastal
10 GENERAL Description Brief 2-3 sentence description of the purpose of the tool. Searchable web tool providing 1) maps users can customize, embed, & download; 2) downloads: spreadsheets, slideshow-ready tables & graphs, & fact sheets; 3) individual community analyses; 4) area comparisons; 5) local sea level & flood risk projections. 100+ demographic, economic & infrastructure variables analyzed for 1000s of communities from zip code to statewide levels. A visualization tool for coastal communities showing potential impacts from sea level rise and coastal flooding as well as a planning level tool. A mapping viewer designed to help coastal communities start discussions about coastal flood hazard impacts with maps that show people, places, and natural resources exposed to coastal flooding. MORIS is an online mapping tool used to search and display spatial data pertaining to the Massachusetts coastal zone. Users can interactively view various data layers (e.g., tide gauge stations, marine protected areas, access points, eelgrass beds, etc.) over a backdrop of aerial photographs, political boundaries, natural resources, human uses, bathymetry, or other data. Users can quickly create and share maps and download the actual data for use in a Geographic Information System (GIS). A visualization tools to show the effects of rising seas on Cape Cod, its critical facilities and transportation infrastructure at one-foot increments between 0 and 6 feet. This webmap addressed a specific aspect of the project, assessing vulnerability and risk, by a GIS analysis of the existing and potential flood risk for the town of Barnstable. This research has been conducted in support of the CRS application, as well as to provide the Town of Barnstable with a greater understanding of where to target future adaptation planning efforts in light of potential climate change impacts. Assets in the existing floodplain have been identified as well as those that may be affected within the next 100 years as floodplains expand due to sea level rise. This tool is intended to help coastal decision makers respond to pending coastal hazard threats. This may include evacuation decisions and pre-staging of resources for road closures and post storm clean-up.
10 GENERAL Target Audience The assumed users of the tool (e.g. planners, coastal managers, public) Decision makers, planners, coastal managers, emergency managers, federal and state agencies, journalists and the general public Decision makers, planners, coastal managers, floodplain managers, emergency managers, coastal scientists and engineers, general public Decision makers, planners, coastal managers, floodplain managers, emergency managers, general public Decision makers, planners, coastal managers, floodplain managers, emergency managers, coastal scientists and engineers, general public Local planners and decision makers, as well as the general public. Decision makers, planners, coastal managers, floodplain managers, general public Emergency managers, other coastal decision-makers, people living or working near enough to the shore to be at risk or have property at risk from coastal flooding
10 GENERAL Skill Level Low (no formal training other than basic computer skills); Medium (need moderate amount of knowledge about coastal management or processes to interpret results); High (need high level of knowledge to interpret information). Low Low Low Low Low Low Low
10 GENERAL Main Tool Outputs Qualitatively different tool functions or modules that a user can take from the tool. For example, a map might be the primary output, however, the tool may also allow the user to comparisons, scenarios or generate reports. Maps, community analyses, wide area analysis comparisons, projections, downloads & reports Maps, photo simulations, flood frequency graphs Maps Maps, tables, and vector GIS data Filterable maps, land coverage simulations, affect on specific critical facilities, bathtub model SLR at 1 foot increments from 1-6 feet; FIRM and SLOSH data separate from SLR; census demographic information. Maps, compare existing and future flood risk Time series tide forecasts, maps depicting inundation areas
10 GENERAL Year Released Year the most current version of the tool was released. Rolling release starting Fall 2013 2013 (Northeast of US) 2015 2012 2015 2015 Updated 2015
10 GENERAL Date Column Last Updated July 2016 October 2014 October, 2015 November, 2015 November, 2015 November, 2015 November, 2015
10 GENERAL Top Three Strengths As succinctly as possible, list the top three strengths that make this tool unique. 1) Comprehensive tool providing exposure analysis, comparisons, and projections, as well as an interactive map. 2) Analyses cover ~100 variables and conducted for 1000's of individual areas (zips, cities, counties, states, planning and legislative districts at all levels). 3) Local projections combine sea level rise and storm surge to give integrated risk estimates by decade. 1) Easy to use via Web browser, with GIS analysis results and map services available; 2) Uses consistent data sets and analysis for coastal areas nation-wide; 3) Includes photos and allows users to visualize impacts of sea level rise at known locations. 1) Allows users to select a location and explore maps that show people, places, and natural resources exposed to coastal flood hazards; 2) Creates a collection of maps to download or share online to communicate flood exposure; 3) Provides guidance for using the maps to engage community members and stakeholders in conversations about potential coastal flood impacts 1) Broad range of authorativite data available with fully substantiated FGDC-compliant metdata; 2) Data can be downloaded as shapefiles, Google Earth (kmz), or tables; 3) Advanced cartographic representations (reorder layers, change symbology color and transparency, and print with legend, scale bar, and title. 1) Provides a county-wide consolidation of geo-located town infrastructure and emergency facilties; 2) incorporates SLOSH and FEMA Flood hazard overlays and effects from hurricanes; 3) shows the effect of SLR on critical facilities and road network. 1) Town specific; 2) Easy to use; 3) Filled a specific need for a larger project 1) Ease of use - one can quickly get a glimpse of shorelines at risk for coastal flooding via color coded watches/warnings. 2) Can quickly link to tide forecasts for selected locations either as time series graph or text watch/warning/advisory product when a headline is in effect. 3) Easily use a slider bar to view inundation extent and depth for selected total water level (as well as 100 yr velocity zones).
10 GENERAL Top Three Limitations As succinctly as possible, list the top three weaknesses or limitations that coastal planners or managers might encounter using this tool. 1) Map should not be used for site-specific decisions (supplement with direct field measurements of elevation), as wider-area analyses are more robust than point-by-point mapping; 2) Levee data are incomplete, and maps/analyses incorporating levees assume condition good and heights infinite; 3) No physical modeling of storm surge or waves on top of sea level rise. Inundation scenarios do not include coastal storm surge, riverine flooding, erosion or other coastal processes; 2) Appropriate for use as a screening-level or planning tool allowing zoom in scale of approximately 1:18,055, but provides map services and data download for more in depth analysis. 3.) Includes fully enclosed federal levees as mapped by the USACE National Levee Database. Partially enclosed, regional, or local levees are being incorporated when suitable levee data when it becomes available. 1) Cannot customize outputs or load additional local inputs directly into the tool; 2) Appropriate for use as a screening-level or planning tool allowing zoom in scale of approximately 1:18,055; 3) Changes or updates to source datasets will not be reflected in the tool until the next data update is completed 1) Sometime slow draw times; 2) Poor raster handling; 3) Data are prepared for reference purposes only and should not be used for, and are not intended for, survey and engineering purposes. 1) Inundation scenarios do not include coastal storm surge, erosion or other coastal processes; 2) Cannot customize outputs or load additional local inputs directly into the tool; 3) sharing and printing outputs limited. 1) Bathtub model used; 2) Limited geographic scope 1) The inundation mapping displays total static water level and does not incorporate contribution to inundation from waves. 2) One needs to refer to Coastal Flood Watch/Warning to know forecast total water level to use for map (future effort will be to default maps to forecast water level). 3) Specific tide forecasts and coastal impact category are only available for selected locations.
10 GENERAL Point of Contact Please give a key contact for questions about the tool and its future development. Name and email address. Dan Rizza: drizza@climatecentral.org Adrianne Harrison: adrianne.harrison@noaa.gov or Jamie Carter: jamie.carter@noaa.gov Russell Jackson: russell.jackson@noaa.gov Daniel W. Sampson: daniel.sampson@state.ma.us Cape Cod Commission Greg Berman: gberman@whoi.edu Jim Notchey: james.notchey@noaa.gov, Bob Thompson: robert.thompson@noaa.gov
20 SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Base Sea Level Elevation Reference surface for which elevation is zero, such as mean higher high water. All other given elevations are computed as the height above this surface. Mean Higher High Water (MHHW) Mean Higher High Water (MHHW) Mean Higher High Water (MHHW) Various Mean Higher High Water (MHHW) 100-year floodplain MLLW and for inundation maps depth of water above ground
20 SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Flood/Inundation Controls Method inundation or water levels are changed by the user (e.g. slider bar, radio buttons) Slider bar with inundation delineated in 1 foot increments from 1 - 10 feet. Toggle button to the right of the slider to view inundation ​risk from sea level rise, tides, storms, and tsunamis in meters: 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 5, 10, 20 & 30. Slider bar with inundation delineated in 1 foot increments from 0 - 6 feet Users selects individual coastal flood hazards or composite flood hazards. User selects the layer of interest, e.g. "The Boston Harbor Association/City of Bpston Projected Flooding Extent." Slider bar with inundation delineated in 1 foot increments from 0 - 6 feet Static, only two levels Slider bar with 1 foot increments
20SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Flood Layers Represented How are the inundation or flood level indicated on the map. Does the map use colors to show flooded areas? Blue - inundation; Hatched - low-lying but isolated Blue - inundation; Green - low-lying areas FEMA flood Zones (1%, 0.2%, V-Zones), Category 3 hurricane storm surge zones (SLOSH MOMs), sea level rise inundation (from NOAA Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts Viewer), shallow coastal flooding (from NOAA Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts Viewer), coastal flood hazard composite Various depending on data source (FEMA National Flood Hazard Layer, Worst Case Hurricane Surge Scenarios (SLOSH), NOAA CSC Sea Level Rise Data; The Boston Harbor Association/City Of Boston Projected Flooding Extent) Green - low-lying areas; Yellow - unaffected; Gradients Pink to Purple - Category 1-4 hurricane, SLOSH model; Orange - FEMA FIRM Special Flood Hazard Areas; Red - FEMA FIRM Coastal High Hazard Areas. Blue/Orange for future flooding, Purple/Red for existing flooding Colors used to depict various depths consistent with NHC real-time inundation maps
20SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Uncertainty Represented Yes/No. Is uncertainty of the flood levels indicated on the map? No for elevation, yes for projections Yes No Yes for NOAA CSC Sea Level Rise Data No No Not on map. Coastal Flood product displays ranges and text info
20SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Way Uncertainty Represented If uncertainty is represented as indicated in the field above, then how is it represented? Briefly describe. Map does not represent uncertainty in elevation values. However, projection tool presents different sea level rise models and scenarios, and reflects uncertainty information as available for these. FOR NOAA CSC SLR Data: Confidence is noted as High vs. Low, so the areas not highlighted as high or low indicate a high confidence of not being inundated: "...the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with low confidence represent location that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times." Surge and total water level forecasts in Coastal Flood Products (when watch, warning, or advisory in effect) depicted by ranges. Text of Coastal Flood Product may also describe uncertainty.
20SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Projects local sea level rise Yes/No. Includes localized (not just global) projections for the amount of sea level rise over time. Local projections must take into account regional and local factors such as sinking land. Yes No No Yes No Yes No - more of a real time tool
20SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Projects future flood elevations Yes/No. Includes projections for how high "standard" floods -- e.g. "1-in-100 year" floods -- will reach in the future, accounting for sea level rise and/or changing storms. Yes No No Yes No Yes No
20SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Projects future flood risk at fixed elevations Yes/No. Includes projections for the future annual and/or cumulative risk of floods to fixed elevations -- e.g. 5 ft. above today's sea level -- accounting for sea level rise and/or changing storms. Yes No No No No Yes No
20SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Projection time periods assessed Include all years/periods for which projections are made. each decade 2020-2100 No No We do not assign dates to particular levels of inundation. No current and 2100 No - more of a real time tool
20SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Flood projections factor in changing frequency or intensity of storms Yes/No. Self-explanatory. Not applicable if flood projections not provided. No No No No No No No
20SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Allows choice of projection scenarios/models Yes/No. Choice of emissions scenario or choice of sea level rise model such as NOAA's lowest, intermediate low, intermediate high, or highest sea level rise scenario; USACE lower, middle, or upper sea level rise projections; or the range of IPCC sea level projections. Yes No No No No No No
20SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Shows levees Yes/No. Shows levees on map. Include source of levee information if possible. Yes Yes - Links to USACE NLD No Sort of- coastal engineering structures are shown. No No Yes
20SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Factors in levees Yes/No. Factors levees into map and any analysis of vulnerable areas. Summarize methods if possible. Yes. For analysis, mapped levees are assumed high and strong enough for flood protection. However, we have no data on levee height, and only 8% of monitored levees in the U.S. are rated in “Acceptable” condition. The main source used, the Midterm Levee Inventory (FEMA/USACE), is the best available national levees dataset, but is incomplete. Surging Seas Map implicitly also includes unmapped. View information on Dams For MA, Surging Seas analysis / map incorporates a shapefile of Charles River, Amelia Earhart, Neponset River, and New Bedford dams, supplied by Chris Watson of University Massachusetts Boston. The system assumes dams are high and strong enough for flood protection, like it does for levees. Due to bathtub model, some flooding will be visible behind the dams. For example, the Charles River and Amelia Earhart dams stand 6.8 ft above Mean Higher High Water (MHHW), but are shown in Surging Seas protecting Cambridge and other areas only up to 4 ft due to alternate pathways for flow indicated by the elevation data. Data limitations, such as incomplete levee and dam data, make assessing protection difficult. Yes if they are captured in LIDAR based elevation data Yes if they are captured in LIDAR based elevation data No No No Yes
20SLR AND FLOOD SCENARIOS Inundation Model Used Briefly and in as non-technical as possible, describe the modeling method used. Modified bathtub approach, modeling hydrologic connectivity and locally adjusted Mean Higher High Water levels. Modified bathtub approach, modeling hydraulic connectivity and locally adjusted Mean Higher High Water levels. The various coastal flood hazard layers displayed are derived from different modeling methods. Refer to layer source information. SLOSH, FEMA Flood Hazard Rate Maps, and modified bathtub approach. Modified bathtub approach, modeling hydrologic connectivity and locally adjusted Mean Higher High Water levels. Bathtub Modified bathtub approach with use of connectivity tool.
30EXPOSURE ANALYSIS Tabulates exposure within designated areas Yes/No. Gives total land, housing, etc. exposed at different flood or sea levels, within units such as cities or counties Yes no just overlay visualization of social and economic data No No Yes Yes No - just area subject to inundation based on total water level selected
30EXPOSURE ANALYSIS Exposure types tabulated Variables analyzed, such as land, housing, property value, population, roads, airports or other infrastructure >100 demographic, economic, environmental and infrastructure variables No No Not exactly, MOSIS has 100s of layers including census & infrastructre data that can be overlayed, some of which will be more relevant than others. Yes, critical facilities/infrastructure, economic, habitat and land area variables No No
30EXPOSURE ANALYSIS Designated areas for tabulation Geographic units within which exposure is tabulated, such as cities, counties, states or zip codes zip codes, cities, counties, states, local through federal legislative districts, planning districts, state agency districts No No No No Yes (town) No
30EXPOSURE ANALYSIS Shows or lists individual exposed facilities or public infrastructure Yes/No. Tool is able to give the user output that would allow them to evaluate potential vulnerable facilities and/or public infrastructure. Output could be either a map, or a report/listing. Lists all facilities analyzed in tables for download. Shows select facilities and infrastructure on map. No Yes, through visualization overlays Yes. User can visually see which infrastrucutre will be inundated under various scenarios. Yes Yes No - not directly
30EXPOSURE ANALYSIS Compares exposure across designated areas Yes/No. Includes display (e.g. heat map) showing how different areas compare (e.g. how do counties compare for exposure of housing) Yes No No No No No No
40SHORELINE PROCESSES Other Flooding Scenarios Modeled Other than the model scenarios above, are there other flooding scenarios mapped? (i.e. specific storm scenarios, shallow coastal flooding, base flood elevations) Fully integrated analysis of SLR projections with flood risk Shallow Coastal Flood Frequency see all flood datasets listed above FEMA National Flood Hazard Layer; Worst Case Hurricane Surge Scenarios (SLOSH); NOAA CSC Sea Level Rise Data; The Boston Harbor Association/City Of Boston Projected Flooding Extent) No 100-year flood from FEMA FIS Coastal flooding resulting from total water level chosen
40SHORELINE PROCESSES Coastal Erosion Yes/No. Does the method used take coastal erosion processes into account? No No No No. We do however have shoreline change data and rates available in MORIS. No No No
40SHORELINE PROCESSES Sediment Dynamics/Deposition Yes/No. Does the method used take coastal sediment dynamics and deposition into account? No No No No No No No
40SHORELINE PROCESSES Storm Events Yes/No. Does the method used take the impacts of future storm events into account? Fully integrated analysis of SLR projections with flood risk No No No Yes, FEMA and SLOSH models No No - not explicitly but one can choose a total water level from a fictitious event to assess extent/depth of flooding.
40SHORELINE PROCESSES Habitat/Species Change Yes/No. Does the method allow the user to visualize potential impacts to habitats and changes in species distribution? No No No No No No No
40SHORELINE PROCESSES Marsh Migration Yes/No. Does the method allow the user to visualize the potential impacts to coastal marshes and how they may migrate with rising sea level? No Yes No No No No No
50TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Basemap Options What types of base map(s) are used in the tool? (e.g. satellite imagery, topographic, streets, hybrid maps) Satellite, Streets Satellite, Streets Satellite, grey canvas Ortho photos, satellite, streets, hybrid, topographic and custom. Satellite, Streets Satellite, Topo, Streets, Terrain Streets, satellite
50TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Main elevation data source Examples include LIDAR or National Elevation Dataset. Lidar Lidar Lidar Lidar Lidar Lidar Lidar
50TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Main elevation data source vertical accuracy Published error. Use maximum error, or accuracy standard, when different sub-datasets have different error. (same as NOAA) NOAA/USGS specs 9.25cm RMSE NOAA/USGS specs 9.25cm RMSE Varaible depending on LIDAR data source. 18 cm at 95% confidence NOAA/USGS specs 9.25cm RMSE MassGIS Data - LiDAR Terrain Data and 2011 Rhode Island Statewide LiDAR data
50TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Horizontal resolution Dimension of elevation grid cell size. 5 Meters (~15 feet) 5 Meters (~15 feet) Varies across datasets. Varaible depending on LIDAR data source. 1 meter 1 m GSD 1 meter
50TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Other Available Data Layers Beyond the inundation/flooding layers, what other unique data layers are available? On map: Social Vulnerability, Population Density, Ethnicity, Income, Property, Landmarks. In analysis and comparison tools: about 100 population and infrastructure variables. Flood Frequency, Social and Economic Vulnerability at Census block groups, Marsh Impacts, Photo visualizations of key landmarks Population density, poverty density, elderly density, employment density, projected population change, developed land cover, critical facilities, land cover changed to developed (1996-2011), natural areas and open space, potential pollution sources Too many to list. FIRM, SLOSH, Social and Economic Vulnerability at Census block groups, critical facilities, effect on road infrastructure. structures (buildings) FEMA 100 year velocity zones
50TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Place name searchable Yes No No Yes Yes Yes No
50TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Maximum Zoom-in What is the farthest in a user can zoom in with the tool? 1:4,500 Tile cached data to 1:18,055 Tile cached data to 1:18,055 Variable depending on basemap. 1:1,128 1:2,500 Leaflet zoom level 18, approximatley 1:2000
50TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Map Services Available Yes/No. Are the data layers in the tool available as map services that can be accessed by the public? No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes
50TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Data Download Available Yes/No. Are the data layers in the tool available for download by the public? Yes Yes No Yes Yes No No
50 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS If data download available, please list types If answered yes for Data Download Available, please list the layers that are available for download. Summary tables and detailed lists in Excel for 100+ demographic, economic, infrastructure and environmental variables, tabulated by state, county, municipality, zip code, planning and legislative districts, & more Inundation, confidence, shallow coastal flooding, SOVI, and DEMs All MORIS data are downloadable although there are limits on file size, both vector and raster. Sea Level Ris 1-6 feet; FIRM; SLOSH; critical facilities; census demographic data n/a n/a
50TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Does tool use other map services? Yes/No. Does the tool consume other map services from other providers as a part of the tool? If so, which ones. (please specify) No Yes, ESRI Basemaps, US. Corps Engineer National Levee Database Yes, ESRI Basemaps, Esri Population Change Projections 2012-2017 Yes, Google, Bing, and OpenStreet Maps as basemap options. While MORIS can accept WMS feeds, the service must be properly configured on the server side. We've had mixed luck and largely given up trying to add external data sources. A shame. Esri base maps Yes, ESRI Basemaps Leaflet
50 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Additional Software Needed Yes/No. Does the user require additional software in order to use the tool? No No No None No No No
50 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Cross Platform Yes/No. Is the tool platform and operating system independent? (i.e. can it operate on all computer platforms equally well) Yes (modern browsers) Yes Yes Yes Yes No, needs Flash Yes
50 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Mobile Compatible Yes/No. Will the tool operate on any mobile platform (e.g. iPad, iPhone, Android)? On modern tablets/phones Yes Yes No. Yes No, needs Flash Haven’t fully tested it yet.
60 OTHER Training Requirements Does the tool require training before it can be used efficiently? None but support available as needed. None None None but support available as needed. None None No
60 OTHER Documentation, Training & Technical Resources Describe the types of documentation on tool methods and training resources available. Research papers for each state, FAQs, methodologies, tutorials FAQs, methodologies, and related technical documents; brief "First Time Tips" video; 56-minute recorded webinar, In-person or online training available upon request FAQs, data documentation, new training link to the tool that includes a pre-recorded detailed demonstration Very thorough documentation in the Help Section. Code is open source and available for download. None n/a Still a work in progress
60 OTHER Is the tool based on, or featured in, any peer-reviewed publication(s)? If so, please list. (INCLUDE LINKS IF AVAILABLE) Please list the peer-reviewed publications that the tool, or underlying model, has discussed and/or featured the tool. Based on Strauss et al 2012 and Tebaldi et al 2012, Environmental Research Letters. Featured in Wong-Parodi G, Fischhoff B, and Strauss BH (2014) Climatic Change, 1-9, Stephens et al 2014 Science Communication, and the Science of Science Communication II Sackler Colloquium PNAS 2014. Marcy, et al., 2011. “New Mapping Tool and Techniques for Visualizing Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts.” In Proceedings of the 2011 Solutions to Coastal Disasters Conference, Anchorage, Alaska, June 26 to June 29, 2011, edited by Louise A. Wallendorf, Chris Jones, Lesley Ewing, and Bob Battalio, 474–90. Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers. None No. Based on the NOAA digitical coast model. No peer-reviewed publications No
60 OTHER Costs Are there costs involved in using this tool? Does the user community bear any of the development cost directly? None None None No. None None None
60 OTHER Are Future Versions Planned? Please describe if there are plans for future improvements to the tool. Yes Version 2.0 released in 2014. Enhancements of base data ongoing. Future updates anticipated No. A trickle of money funds bug fixes largely related to browser version and changes in basemap licensing/configuration. Improve sharing, combine SLR with SLOSH, increase effected infrastructure. Unlikely Yes